Fashion

Missguided ditches the airbrush with stretch-marked models

By Kitty Knowles 9 November 2017
Summary

The savvy fashion brand Missguided follows ASOS in going airbrush-free.

Body positivity has never been more on-trend – and this week it’s British retailer Missguided that’s flying the flag for fashion.

The Manchester-based business has just launched a new season of online fashion sported by models with stretch-marks.

And why not?

These lines that adorn so many chests, hips, and thighs, should be worn with pride.

Sporting stretch-marks with pride

Most women have stretch-marks on some part of their body – they’re simply a sign of hormonal growth spurts, weight fluctuation, or pregnancy.

Even the superstars who grace the covers of magazines have them, but they’re usually covered up with makeup, or airbrushed out.

Not every model showcasing the new Missguided line has stretchmarks on show, but those who do stand a celebration of natural beauty.

A number of women have already taken to Twitter to celebrate calling the move “amazing”, “refreshing” and “authentic”.

“This makes me feel so much better, after seeing my stretch marks in a changing room mirror yesterday I nearly cried,” shared one Twitter user.

The only downside, it seems, is that seeing stretch-marks warrants celebration:

“This is so great!! Wish it wasn’t such a surprising or rare thing though,” commented one shopper.

 


Fashion forward

The reality for smart fashion brands is that when it comes to body positivity they are playing catch-up – today’s young millennial shoppers are the feminists and bloggers already at the fore.

So, if digital brands want happy, engaged customers, they must lean in to body positivity – or risk seeming dated and damaging their bottom line.

Missguided isn’t the first to realise this, ASOS ditched the airbrush earlier this summer.

Even in high fashion, it’s no coincidence that this year France, the home of chic, decided to ban too-thin models from the catwalk.

As an industry, the fashion world is starting to realise that modern shoppers want models they can identify with – and that means embracing diversity of all kinds. This year’s New York Fashion Week was the most diverse yet, something also reflected in more diverse ads in this year’s print magazines.

True beauty lies in our differences, what makes us unique.

Embracing that is isn’t just body positive – it’s smart business sense.