Food & Drink

Food porn is hot – but TV’s The Secrets of Your Food puts a blowtorch to it

By Kitty Knowles 22 February 2017
Summary

We are SO ready to tuck in.

The smells, tastes, and textures of foods are delightful. But life isn’t all food porn.

A lot of what makes food miraculous, is what’s actually inside what we eat.

That’s why it’s great to see new BBC series The Secrets of Your Food get out the blowtorches to show audiences why we actually enjoy the dishes we love.

James Wong visits Philippine rice terraces in The Secrets of your Food. Pic: BBC/Chris Pitt
James Wong visits Philippine rice terraces in The Secrets of your Food. Pic: BBC/Chris Pitt

When molecules meet tasty morsels

Presented by nutritionist Michael Mosley and botanist James Wong, each episode examines your favourite delicious foods on a molecular level.

First life-building breastmilk gets put in the centrifuge, rainbow-celled citrus fruits go under the microscope, and eggs are even dissected with circular saws.

But the series is a cultural journey as well as a scientific one.

We loved seeing Wong explore the beautiful Banaue rice terraces in the Philippines, and you can practically smell the 160-year old ‘mother dough’ Mosley sniffs, as it’s tended to in San Francisco’s incredible Boudin sourdough bakery.

Rotten-looking huitlacoche (on the right). Pic: CC/Tomascastelazo.
Rotten-looking huitlacoche (on the right). Pic: CC/Tomascastelazo.

Mouthwatering facts

What’s more, the show’s surprising, succulent, facts are exposed hard and fast.

Did you know that in Puebla, Mexico, infected corn is a delicacy? The fungus-filled ‘huitlacoche’ is not only a source of rare amino acids, but it tastes like truffles and sells for twice the price of its healthy corn cob cousins.

Yes, omega-3 is found in oily fish – but did you know it’s also found in the free-roaming highland cattle, who ingest it from highland clover?

Sorry bodybuilders, a water bath experiment just confirmed that raw eggs only deliver half of their potential protein supply. And the lactose intolerant among you should know, there’s a yoghurt made in remote Bulgarian villages that you can enjoy – that could statistically help you live to 100.

The Secrets of Your Food: Doicho and Dobrina with their lactose-intolerant friendly yoghurt in, Laki, Bulgaria. Pic: BBC/Chris Pitt
The Secrets of Your Food: Doicho and Dobrina with their lactose-intolerant friendly yoghurt in, Laki, Bulgaria. Pic: BBC/Chris Pitt

Nourishing knowledge

By the time The Secrets of Your Food got to the sunshine-storing properties of portobello mushrooms, we didn’t just feel a hunger for food, but a hunger for more knowledge.

If you love food you’ll love the new series, and you’ll be left hankering for more.

The Secrets of Your Food will air at 9pm on Friday 24 February, on BBC Two.