Trend

The IKEA Growroom isn’t just pretty – it’s the future

By Kitty Knowles 23 February 2017
Summary

IKEA Greenroom: Grow your own veggies from a lovely flat-pack orb.

We know that eating your greens is good for you – scientists now recommend stuffing in a whopping 10 portions a day.

To make this easier, why not grow your own from home, in a delightful flat-pack ‘Growroom’?

The Growroom

If you’ve always wanted a garden — but you live in a city — Denmark-based Space10 can help. The company, which supported by IKEA, has designed a DIY pop-up garden that you can construct at home.

Instructions provide 17 clear steps you’ll need to cut and construct the plywood structure (IKEA doesn’t stock the parts), and when it’s finished it not only looks lovely from the outside, you can admire your groceries from within.

“It empowers people to grow their own food much more locally in a beautiful and sustainable way,” say the Space10 team.

Aerofarm are innovation the field with vertical farms. Pics: Aerofarms. Aerofarm are innovation the field with vertical farms. Pics: Aerofarms.
Aerofarm are innovation the field with vertical farms. Pics: Aerofarms.

The wider trend

Indeed Ikea’s Growroom isn’t just a beautiful extravagance. Growing the tasty greens we need in traditional ways is becoming increasingly problematic.

Conventional farming is an expensive process that requires lots of space; something we lack as our population grows. What’s more, our farms simply aren’t where we need them to be (today 50% of the world’s population lives in cities, and this will rise to 80% by 2050).

Farming in fields isn’t practical or environmentally friendly: who wants to pours chemicals and pesticides into the ground, to generate just a few harvests a year, knowing full-well that 30% of it will spoil before reaching your plate?

The Ring Garden. Pic: Land Art Generator Initiative

Local lettuces

Already we are seeing more and more urban farms crop up – London is home to the floating Farmopolis bar, giant ‘vertical farms‘ are already feeding the masses, and dreamy concepts like The Ring Garden tackle food, water and energy shortages head-on.

Buildings are also today being designed to incorporate spaces to grow plants, with architects like Stefano Boeri leading the way.

Japan even sports mini farm vending machines.

Grow at home

In the future our farms will become more personal still, as innovations like the NASA Smart Herb Garden make home-growing easy.

Eventually you’ll have your own mini-fridge garden in the kitchen, food futurist Dr Morgaine Gaye told The Memo.

“Think about the possibility of an integrated system – a bit like a fridge – where different herbs and vegetables are growing and you pluck them from the vending machine,” she says.

We could well have systems like The Chef's Farm growing food in our kitchens of the future.
We could well have systems like The Chef's Farm growing food in our kitchens of the future.

Let the ideas blossom

We don’t know anyone who wouldn’t want the IKEA Growroom in their home (space-permitting).

It’s a stunning design, and would be better for your health, your budget, and the earth you live on.

But while it’s gorgeous, it’s important to understand the structure as part of a wider trend.

The rise of the personal farm is only just beginning.